Day 4-5: America so Plain

After a day of dreadful driving, all 623 miles of it, I arrived at wonderful KCK aka Kansas City Kansas.  Because apparently there is a Kansas City Missouri which is of course more bourgeoisie and a lot more like a metropolitan center.

But oh man, America is so plain, and by plain I mean the Great Plains. With its never-ending rolling greens, it is as if the entire western Kansas is a huge open golf course with bison prancing around. Other than that, well you have no where to hide from the harsh winds, which moves so fast people have thought to put wind turbans up and take advantage of that. It moved the larger trucks left and right and left a new driver like me sweaty with angst.

However, once I hit Topeka and Lawrence, the scene shifted. There was actually trees, I know OMG. And the climate became more humid and wet. Marsh lands and river became more prevalent as well. The drive made me appreciate even more the tenacity and drive of those people who had moved from the east coast to the west coast per-continental railroad. Not only do they have to deal with the crushing wind and boredom of the great plains, but the Rockies in Colorado, and then also the arid lands of Utah and Nevada before finally reaching California. No wonder some of them stopped and just settled along the way.

Other than the Jesus sign over 10 miles, there wasn’t anything out of the ordinary in Kansas. Oh wait, there is. My first Asian family sighting since I left home five days ago was in Hays, Kansas. All American city of Hays, Kansas. I was filling my  gas, and there it was  in a Kansas plated SUV, a full-flesh Asian family. It made my entire trip that much better.

Alas, I would like to thank my friend for being from Kansas, it was so wonderful to see her and let her show me a different side of Kansas City, not to mention the BBQ at Oklahoma Joe’s. Definitely worthy of the title “Best I’ve Ever Had”. It was just so energizing to see someone I knew after thousands of lonely miles, I love her for that and I really appreciate the time spent.

If I have to ever drive across the country again, which I probably do driving back home, I would do it alone. Its so much loneliness, I started talking to my Tepig. My hopes that intense sharing on social media would cure the loneliness, but nope sorry it doesn’t work like that. No matter how many likes you get and how many comments, it’s still just you in  car across the beautiful terrain from sea to shining sea.

Day 2-3: America so Beautiful

The second day of driving gets me exactly 1,000 miles from home in mile high Denver. Population- definitely a lot more than all the parts of Utah I drove through.

I must admit, even though Utah is breathtaking in its own right. I would not lay my eggs there if I were a hen. But Colorado in comparison, just might be the most beautiful state I’ve ever drove through. It’s so beautiful, I decided to stay 2 days here. I mean I don’t kid around with my time.

No wonder this is one of the fittest states and cities in the USA. I woke up at 7 :00 AM to check out the Red Rock Amphitheater and there were already hundreds of people jumping up and down the stairs and biking around as if strenuous activities that breaks down their knees and ankles will help prolong their life. I am sure it does, why else would so many people be out there this early in the morning.

Mt. Evans in nearby Idaho Springs was even better. Supposedly the highest peak in the nearby Rockies, though I have my reservations. It was so cold up in the thin air of 14,900 ft, I had to burst out my old monk robes cause it was the only heavy clothing I got in the trunk. But the view was wow, just wow. If I could marrying into this state, I definitely would.

This section of the road really made me realize just how beautiful America is, how vast the land, how different the Eco-systems it contains, and more importantly how well this wonderful nature is kept (at least the parts I saw in colorado). We are very fortunate to live in a nation whose economy is not solely based on the exploitation of our natural resources, though we do a good job of exploiting our own citizens and other nation’s resources in the name of more nobel pursuits. But man, God sure did bless America.

Driving through the twists and turns of the mountains reminded me of the tough circumstances that the early settlers faced as they wagoned their ways from the east coast through the Rockies and into Utah, then Nevada and California and so on. Even with the amenities of the 21st century, it’s still a tough stretch of land. Much respect to those who travelled the roads before me.

Funny thing though, since I left my home in SoCal, I have yet to see any other Asian homies this entire trip. Not at the gas station, not at the attractions, and not at the restaurants I ate at. Maybe I just took the wrong turns or maybe not. I don’t know.

Next stop Kansas City, i am not even sure if that’s in Kansas or Missouri but I bet I will see lots of great things there.